development

Development Timetable

Children with Down syndrome generally follow the same pattern of development as typically developing children, but at a slower rate.  There is a great deal of individual variation in the age different skills are developed by children with Down syndrome, just as there is with all children.  Children with Down syndrome face challenges in all the areas of development –

  • Language and Communication
  • Cognitive
  • Social and Emotional
  • Gross Motor
  • Fine Motor
  • Self-Help

Because children with Down syndrome also have some degree of intellectual disability they often have the most difficulty with more abstract language based concepts.

Articles and Information

Down Syndrome Child Development Charts

An Overview of the Development of Children with Down Syndrome (5-11 years)

Resources

Bruni, Maryanne  Fine Motor Skills in Children with Down Syndrome : A Guide for Parents and Teachers

Hanson, Marci  Teaching Your Down’s Syndrome Infant : A Guide for Parents

HELP : Hawaii Early Learning Profile – Activity Guide

Winders, Patricia  Gross Motor Skills in Children with Down Syndrome : A Guide for Parents and Teachers

Calendar page 6

Self-Help Skills

Articles and Information

Social Development for Individuals with Down Syndrome : an overview – Independence and Self Help Skills

Motor Development and Self-Help Skills Milestones to view click on > milestones, then > motor & self-help

Clothing Optional by Rachael Smith

Resources

Bruni, Maryanne  Fine Motor Skills in Children with Down Syndrome :  A Guide for Parents and Teachers

Hanson, Marci  Teaching Your Down’s Syndrome Infant : A Guide for Parents

HELP : Hawaii Early Learning Profile – Activity Guide

Therapy Focus Inc  Self Care Skills  Moving on Up : Helping Children Move from Primary to High School

Winders, Patricia  Gross Motor Skills in Children with Down Syndrome :  A Guide for Parents and Teachers

Links

Independent Living Centre  www.ilc.com.au

River Abilities  www.riverabilities.com.au/

Toilet Training Children With Down syndrome by Jane Orville

reproduced with permission from www.articlecity.com

Most parents wonder how their children with Down syndrome will learn to become toilet trained.  This is understandably an anxious time for a parent, as you might be thinking about sending your child to a preschool program and wonder if he will ever be out of diapers.  Teaching any child to use the toilet can be a frustrating time for parents, and the child, but if you relax and remember that you cannot “make” him learn before he is ready, he will leave those diapers behind some day.

One professional suggests taking a few days to document your child’s voiding schedule.  Check his diaper every twenty to thirty minutes to see when he is going and what (urine, bowel movement).  When data is taken for a few days and you can see some semblance of a pattern, you will want to schedule toilet times for those specific times of the day.

One suggestion is to give your child some fluids to drink about 15-20 minutes before you plan on toileting him.  Tell your child he is going to use the toilet, and if needed, use the sign for it and help him make the sign.

Make his toileting experience pleasant.  Have books available for looking at during this time, and keep toileting time short, about 7 or 8 minutes at the most.  If your child does not void during this time, don’t force it or use an unpleasant or frustrated tone.  Have him get off and then try again at the next scheduled time.

A lot of praise is necessary when toilet training your child, especially for a child who has Down syndrome.  Giving an edible reinforcement might be tried, but this can lead to the child expecting something to eat every time he has success on the the toilet.  Since children with Down syndrome already may struggle with weight issues, it is recommended that reinforcements such as verbal praise, hugs, high fives be used instead.

Some parents may have`expectations for their child in the area of toilet training that`are too high.  Remember that not only is your child delayed intellectually, he also may lack the proper muscle control at the average age that a typical child is toilet trained.  He will eventually learn this too; it will be on his own individual timetable.

Links

Spina Bifida Association of Wa Inc run an incontinence pad scheme supported by Lotteries Commission.  If your child is aged between 3 and 15 and lives at home with you full time you may be eligible to purchase nappies at a discounted price.  For more information phone (08) 9346 7520.

Continence Aids Assistance Scheme provides an annual subsidy of up to $479.40 each year to eligible families of children aged 5 and above.  For more information visit http://www.intouchdirect.com.au/caas

Articles and Information

Toilet Training your child with Down Syndrome by Donna Heerensperger

Toilet training made semi-easy by Kent Moreno

Toilet training by Darlene Devenny

Resources

Green, Dr Christopher  Toddler Taming : Children with Disabilities volume 6 [VHS Video]

Toilet training children with Autism and other developmental delays

Explaining Down Syndrome To Your DS Child

Articles and Information

Let’s Talk About Down Syndrome – a brochure created to help inform people with an intellectual disability about Down Syndrome

I have Down’s Syndrome – but don’t feel sorry for me by Anya Souza

Living with Down syndrome